Broth: Health Benefits Approved by Mom

soup broth tops the list of healing foods to eat when you're feeling sick or simply need a soothing, light and nutritious meal.

Varieties of soup broth include vegetable, fish, chicken, beef and bone broth without meat. Make your broth by simmering the ingredients, straining off the solids and saving the liquid. Overall, broths don't contain much protein, are low in carbs, and abundant in nutrients. For robust flavor and nutrition power, you want the broth to include a variety of veggies and herbs such as carrots, celery, garlic, mushrooms, onion, spinach, leeks, broccoli, green beans, bay leaf, turmeric, ginger, parsley, and pepper to name a few.

The soothing effect of drinking warm, steaming broth happens to be an effective way to loosen up mucus when you have a stuffy nose and it can ease irritation from a sore throat. Broth helps provide what the body needs to prevent dehydration and manage nausea. This is because broth contains many minerals, including potassium, sodium, and calcium, which are important to hydration and heart and muscle function. Broth also contains Vitamin A which is important for immunity. The wider the variety of veggies and herbs included in the broth, the more robust the vitamin and anti-inflammatory power. 

Consider this soup-broth bonus: it's not only good for you when fever hits; the endless varieties of broth offer health benefits when you make it a frequent part of your usual diet.

References:

Lynn, D. "Is Soup Broth Good for You?"posted at Livestrong.com Accessed 13 Dec 2018: https://www.livestrong.com/article/439591-is-soup-broth-good-for-you/

Saketkhoo,K. et al., "Effects of Drinking Hot Water, Cold Water, and Chicken Soup on Nasal Mucus Velocity and Nasal Airflow Resistance." Chest Jnl (Oct 1978) 74:4, 408-410. Accessed 15 Dec 2018: https://journal.chestnet.org/article/S0012-3692(15)37387-6/fulltext

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